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Top ten hints and tips

  • Don't take it personally. There is a medical reason for much of the child's behaviour.
  • A reason is not an excuse. ADHD is the reason for unacceptable behaviour, but not an excuse for it. With your help, children with ADHD can learn to control their behaviour better.
  • Keep in contact with the parents so that you know each other's problems and share the same approach.
  • Sit the child close to you. Ideally put them between two calm and well-behaved pupils, and away from doors, windows and other potential distractions.
  • Provide legitimate opportunities to be physically active. Let them be the one to go and fetch something or wipe the board.
  • Try to find a way to allow them to fidget. Squeeze balls are at least quiet and can be less distracting for others around.
  • Children with ADHD have difficulty with planning activities and doing them in the right order. It's helpful to give an overview of what you want them to achieve: "You're going to write a review of a book". Then break it into smaller steps: "First I'd like you to choose a book..." etc. A written checklist can be useful. Some children find it useful to say out loud what they are going to do next. Children with ADHD need practice in planning and sequencing activities.
  • Beware of changes to routine and changes of activity. Children with ADHD may find these particularly unsettling. Explain in advance what's going to happen if it's different to what they expect.
  • Improve their confidence and self-esteem by praising them in public for good behaviour and reprimanding them quietly, one-to-one.
  • Teasing and bullying by other pupils may be a problem, inside and outside the classroom. Setting them up with an older "buddy" who can help to keep them out of trouble may be helpful in some cases.
 

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Visit our resource centre for useful information and helpful activities for parents, teachers and teenagers living with ADHD.

 

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